A world famous conductor rescued a bride’s big day after her pianist got stuck in traffic.

13-08-09 Image 4

A world famous conductor rescued a bride’s big day after her pianist got stuck in traffic.

Music maestro Bramwell Tovey stepped in after Lucy Stubbs and Sam Taylor were left in the lurch just 30 minutes before the ceremony.

The relieved couple gratefully accepted his help – even though they had no idea he was director of the renowned Vancouver Symphony Orchestra and a concert pianist.

Big-hearted Bramwell, 56, offered his services as he prepared for a concert next door to the wedding venue in Norwich.

After hearing of the couple’s plight he nipped round just five minutes before they were due to take their vows and started tinkling away on the ivories in his shorts and casual shirt. Despite having no sheet music, he wowed guests with his renditions of Moon River and A Nightingale sang in Berkley Square.

He then played Gershwin’s Night and Day which Lucy, 30, had chosen to mark her arrival with her father at the city’s Blackfriar’s Hall.

He finished off with Rachmaninov’s Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini followed by the traditional Wedding March. Office administrator Lucy, 30, said: “He was fantastic. He just walked in, lifted the piano lid and began playing, almost as if it had all been planned.

“But we didn’t have a clue who he was. It was the weirdest stroke of fate. It was only when we got home and looked him up on the internet that we realised how famous he is.”

Chef Sam, 24, added: “He was a real hero and saved the day.”

Bramwell, who is also guest conductor with the New York and LA philharmonic orchestras, had been getting ready to perform with the National Youth Brass Band of Great Britain.

After having photos taken with the bride and groom, he got straight back to rehearsals.

Lucy and Sam, now on honeymoon in Barcelona, have emailed him to say thank you for helping to save their big day.

One of Bramwell’s colleagues said last night: “He’s a fantastic musician and bloke.”

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